Dual-Sport Motorcycle Guide

Best Dual-Sport Motorcycles

Middleweight adventurers for weekend excursions or round the world travel​

SUB 400cc BEST Dual-Sport MotorcycleS

Yamaha WR250R Overview

Yamaha WR250 Dual-Sport Motorcycle

Yamaha WR250R - Specs

Production dates: 2008 – Present                            Price: $6,699 – £6,499

Power: 30 hp                                                                 Engine Size: 246 cc

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Liquid Cooled

Dry Weight: 126kg (278 lbs)                                        Wet Weight: 133kg (295 lbs)

Fuelling: Fuel Injection

Tank Size: 7.9 Litre (2.1 US Gal)

Production dates: 2008 – Present                   

Price: $6,699 – £6,499

Power: 30 hp                      Engine Size: 246 cc

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Liquid Cooled

Dry Weight: 126kg (278 lbs)                               

Wet Weight: 133kg (295 lbs)

Fuelling: Fuel Injection

Tank Size: 7.9 Litre (2.1 US Gal)

Yamaha WR250R - Overview

Lightweight
80%
Power
30%
Offroad Ability
80%
Road Manners
30%

About

The WR250R is a dual-sport motorcycle launched in 2008 by Yamaha Motor Company. Based on the WR range of dedicated offroad motorcycles, the WR250R is intended for use both on the road and off, which makes it work as a trail bike or as a nimble urban commuter.

WHY IS IT GOOD?

The WR250R is very well made for such a small dual-sport motorcycle, it features fully adjustable 46mm KYB inverted forks at the front, a fully adjustable rear shock, a lightweight aluminium frame and grunty fuel-injected 250cc single-cylinder engine, which produces a fair amount of power for its size. In addition, the low weight of the WR250R makes it supremely agile and ideal for tackling tight trails and challenging offroad terrain. 

The WR designation indicates the use of a wide-ratio gearbox which allows for sufficient response at low speeds whilst still delivering enough power to cruise at faster speeds. The also aftermarket has many spares available to turn this little machine into a brilliant adventuring companion. Add an IMS  18 litre fuel tank, some rackless luggage and some suspension upgrades (for the added weight) and you have a very capable dual-sport motorcycle which is perfect for the new adventure rider or as a single-track explorer.

WHAT’S NOT SO GOOD?

Due to the generous 270 mm (10.6 inches) of ground clearance, the WR’s seat height is somewhat on the tall side for smaller riders. Its small 8-litre tank and lack of wind protection, also make long-range touring with it a challenge. This is mitigated somewhat by the excellent fuel consumption but remains a compromise for such a small package. The WR250R is also quite expensive for such a small motorcycle but this also comes down to the quality components Yamaha have used.

 

Honda CRF250L Rally - overview

Lightweight
70%
Power
25%
Offroad Ability
65%
Road Manners
45%

About

Launched in 2017  by Honda Motor Company the CRF250L Rally is a recent addition to the dual-sport motorcycle family.  With its rally-inspired looks, long-travel suspension, stock bash plate and generous wind protection, it ticks many of the boxes of the perfect adventure bike.

WHY IS IT GOOD?

Coming in cheaper than the WR250R and with many features packed in as standard, there is much to like about the CFR250L. Its mellow suspension and 270 mm (10.6 inches) of ground clearance helps it swallow up bumps and rugged terrain with confidence. The liquid-cooled and fuel-injected engine does however boast an outstanding fuel consumption, which is beneficial given the small 10-litre tank fitted as standard.

A nice feature of the CRF250L Rally is that ABS brakes come as an option, making it safer to use on the road. The good ergonomics and standard windscreen also makes travelling on the road for long distances comfortable, however, the CRF250L Rally is also quite capable of tackling offroad situations. Overall the CRF250L Rally is well designed, comfortable and capable, making it a desirable option for those starting out their dual-sport motorcycle adventures or looking for a small-sized offroad bike. 

WHAT’S NOT SO GOOD?

Don’t confuse this for a Dakar Rally racer though, as it is a small-sized low-tune adventure bike. The engine is noticeably underpowered with the generous fairing and steel frame creating quite some bulk for the 25 horsepower, 250cc engine to propel convincingly. The suspension provided by its 43 mm – sadly non-adjustable – upside-down forks, is also on the soft side, as with most Japanese dual-sport motorcycles.

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The CRF250L Rally also has a sibling the CRF250L launched in 2012, which has no fairing, a smaller tank, but comes in lighter, making it more suited for difficult offroad situation. The CRF250L nicknamed “Rhonda the Honda” was also the bike that took Steph Jeavons onto all seven continents. on her round the world trip. – Anton

Honda CRF250L Rally Overview

Honda CRF250L Rally Dual-Sport Motorcycle

Honda CRF250L Rally - Specs

Production dates: 2017- Present                      Price: $5,899 – £5,399

Power: 25 hp                                                         Engine Size: 249 cc

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Liquid Cooled

Dry Weight: 145kg (320lbs)                                 Wet Weight: 157kg (346lbs)

Fuelling: Fuel Injection

Tank Size: 10.1 Litre (2.7 US Gal)

Production dates: 2017- Present                  

Price: $5,899 – £5,399

Power: 25 hp                       Engine Size: 249 cc

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Liquid Cooled

Dry Weight: 145kg (320lbs)                              

Wet Weight: 157kg (346lbs)

Fuelling: Fuel Injection

Tank Size: 10.1 Litre (2.7 US Gal)

Suzuki DRZ400 - Overview

Suzuki DRZ400 Dual-Sport Motorcycle

Suzuki DRZ400 - Specs

Production dates: 2000- Present                       Price: $6,699 (New) – £3,000 (2nd hand)

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Liquid Cooled

Power: 39 hp                                                          Engine Size: 398 cc

Dry Weight: 132kg (291lbs)                                 Wet Weight: 145kg (320lbs)

Fuelling: Carburetor

Tank Size: 10 Litre (2.6 US Gal)

Production dates: 2000- Present                       

Price: $6,699 (New) – £3,000 (2nd hand)

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Liquid Cooled

Power: 39 hp                  Engine Size: 398 cc

Dry Weight: 132kg (291lbs)                                 

Wet Weight: 145kg (320lbs)

Fuelling: Carburetor

Tank Size: 10 Litre (2.6 US Gal)

Suzuki DRZ400 - Overview

Lightweight
75%
Power
40%
Offroad Ability
70%
Road Manners
40%

About

The DRZ400S produced by Suzuki Motor Corporation has been around since the year 2000 in almost unchanged form. This middleweight dual-sport motorcycle is almost synonymous with adventure riding.  Whilst not remarkable in terms of weight or power the DRZ400 achieves an impressive balance of reliability, simplicity and performance. 

WHY IS IT GOOD?

The DRZ400 is almost unchallenged in its category being more powerful than its 250cc brethren and slightly more agile than the rest of the 650cc dual-sport motorcycles on the market. This has allowed the DRZ400 to carve out its own niche in the market making it one of the most successful dual-sports ever made. 

The engine is fed by a CV carburettor, meaning there are no electronic components or pumps to break-down on the trail and it can be easily maintained. The 389cc mill is liquid-cooled and develops just under 40 horsepower, plenty enough to propel you along main roads and single tracks.

At 132 kg dry, the DRZ 400 is also light enough to be taken down tight trails but powerful enough to propel you along the highway if needed. Having been in production for so long, the DRZ is cheap to purchase and easy to acquire parts for. The aftermarket is also rife with accessories to customise the bike to suit your needs. 

WHAT’S NOT SO GOOD?

Suspension and fuel range are usually the main considerations when looking at upgrades, as the 10-litre fuel tank is not geared towards travel and the front forks and rear shock as with most Japanese dual-sports are on the soft side. Cramped ergonomics are also a complaint for taller riders, but can easily be fixed with aftermarket footpegs and handlebars. The lack of 6th gear is also somewhat prominent though and maintaining highway speeds for long distances is not the DRZ’s strength.

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There is another version of the Suzuki DRZ400, the DRZ400 “E” version which is more geared towards offroad and has more power, thanks to different engine internals and a bigger Keihin FCR39 carburettor.  – Anton

The predecessor of the DRZ400, the Suzuki DR350 achieved a cult following thanks to the round the world journey of Austin Vince and friends in the motorcycle adventure documentary, Mondo Enduro

650CC+ BEST DUAL-SPORT Motorcycles

Honda XR650L - Overview

Lightweight
70%
Power
40%
Offroad Ability
75%
Road Manners
40%

About

The XR650L (not be confused with the XR650R) by Honda Motor Company is one of the longest-running and popular lines of dual-sport motorcycles ever produced. The XR650L has been around since 1993, yet it’s basic but functional package still allows it to stand its own against modern motorcycles.

WHY IS IT GOOD? 

Remarkable in its simplicity the Honda air-cooled single-cylinder engine provides ample torque to propel the XR650L offroad whilst delivering well-known reliability. The frame taken from the XR600 series of Honda’s gives the XR650L more aggressive offroad ergonomics and keeps the weight low. The bike’s supple but efficient suspension provides balance and agility offroad making the Honda able to take-on difficult terrain with ease. 

There is not much to go wrong on the XR650L, there are no external pumps, no radiators or coolers that can break in a fall, and no fiddly electronics. Generous service intervals and simple mechanics means the bike can be worked on anywhere with very basic tools. Having been around for decades the XR650L has gathered a sizeable following and the aftermarket can also provide a large number of upgrades to the now ageing design.

WHAT’S NOT SO GOOD?

One of the Honda’s main strength, its offroad worthiness is also one of its pitfalls, adapting the bike to be better on the road is difficult as these mostly related to the vibey engine, close-ratio gearbox and lack of cush drive on the rear wheel, parts which are difficult to change or modify. If most of your adventures are offroad then the XR650L is great, however if long-distance travelling is your intent then the Suzuki DR650SE (below) is well known in this regard and is better suited for adventure touring.

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If you’re looking for it the X650L’s snappier, race-bred cousin the XR650R is featured in the Enduro section. – Anton

Honda XR650L - Overview

Honda XR650L Dual-Sport Motorcycle

Honda XR650L - Specs

Production dates: 1993 – Present                  Price: $6,899 

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Air Cooled

Power: 41 hp                                                      Engine Size: 644cc

Dry Weight: 147kg (324lbs)                             Wet Weight: 158kg (348lbs)

Fuelling: Carburetor

Tank Size: 10.6 Litre (2.8 US Gal)

Production dates: 1993 – Present                  

Price: $6,899 

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Air Cooled

Power: 41 hp                   Engine Size: 644cc

Dry Weight: 147kg (324lbs)             

 Wet Weight: 158kg (348lbs)

Fuelling: Carburetor

Tank Size: 10.6 Litre (2.8 US Gal)

Suzuki DR650 - Overview

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“We travel mostly on dirt when possible and heavy bikes are not your friend. The DR650 is a cheap reliable dual-purpose bike that had very little changes since it’s birth in 1996. With a few upgrades, you can transform it into a good overlander dual-sport bike that can go anywhere. Parts are readily available and it is dead easy to work and fix.” – Michnus and Elsebie, Pikipiki Overland

Photo and quote used with permission from Pikipiki Overland.

Suzuki DR650 - Specs

Production dates: 1996- Present                   Price: $6,549 

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Oil and Air Cooled

Power: 43 hp                                                      Engine Size: 644cc

Dry Weight: 147kg (324lbs)                             Wet Weight: 166kg (366lbs)

Fuelling: Carburetor

Tank Size: 13 Litre (3.4 US Gal)

Production dates: 1996- Present                   

Price: $6,549 

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Oil and Air Cooled

Power: 43 hp                       Engine Size: 644cc

Dry Weight: 147kg (324lbs)                             

Wet Weight: 166kg (366lbs)

Fuelling: Carburetor

Tank Size: 13 Litre (3.4 US Gal)

SUZUKI DR650 - Overview

Lightweight
70%
Power
40%
Offroad Ability
70%
Road Manners
50%

About

Produced by Suzuki Motor Corporation the DR650 is a longstanding dual-sport motorcycle classic that gives the XR650L a run for its money in this category. It is not uncommon to see heavily modified DR650s being used for overland travel, the mix of simplicity, reliability and offroad ability make it a very appealing package.

WHY IS IT GOOD?

Whilst not as aggressive offroad, the DR650 is more comfortable at higher speeds and on-road than the XR650L. The suspension is softer and the riding position not as aggressive, however in terms of weight, power and simplicity both bikes are very similar. The main difference, however, is that it is probably easier to make the DR650SE better offroad than it is to make the XR650L comfortable on-road.

The DR650’s greatest strength lies in its versatility, loaded up with equipment it can happily plod along at highway speed and when the terrain turns rugged the bike is just a capable of tackling the offroad terrain. The carburettor fed, single-cylinder engine is bombproof, the DR650 is widely regarded as having one of the most reliable engines on the market.

Thanks to its long production run the aftermarket is teeming with accessories, from 30-litre fuel tanks, side racks, lowered footpegs, LED headlights and suspension upgrades, almost every part on the DR650 can be bought and upgraded to suit your needs. Spares are easy to find and maintenance is easy to handle which makes the DR650 a favourite among RTW travellers. 

WHAT’S NOT SO GOOD?

In stock form, the DR650 is slightly anaemic, the stock muffler weighs a ton, the fuelling is way too lean and the bike is severely under-sprung. Once the suspension has been upgraded, the bikes’ offroad performance combined with its light chassis means there are very little situations where the DR650 is out of its comfort zone. The only consideration is the oil cooler which needs to be guarded against impacts, and the NSU screw which is hidden behind the clutch plates which needs tightening on older models. 

Kawasaki - KLR650

Lightweight
50%
Power
35%
Offroad Ability
60%
Road Manners
65%

About

Present on the market since 1987 but completely redesigned in 2008 the KLR 650 built by Kawasaki is another dual sport classic which is widely recognized and venerated by the adventure riding community.

WHY IS IT GOOD?

The KLR has gained a reputation as one of the best dual-sport motorcycles ever made thanks to its accessibility and ease of use. Not built for speed or aggressive offroad riding the KLR 650’s main attraction is it’s out of the box readiness to tackle any adventure. A comprehensive fairing offers protection from the elements, and it comes standard with a massive 23-litre tank. Its bomb-proof, carburettor fed, liquid-cooled 651cc mill the KLR 650 is capable of racking up miles with comfort and when the going gets rough the KLR can follow any other dual-sport, at its own pace, off the tarmac. 

The pre-2008 version has a boxier aesthetics than its successor and is regarded as being better suited for offroad riding than its newer counterpart. The post-2008 version (pictured here) has a sleeker design and is generally viewed as being better on the road. Both versions of the KLR are well regarded, you can expect very little problems with either.

That the KLR line has been present on the market for over three decades attests to its popularity amongst adventure riders, as a no-frills, inexpensive and reliable dual-sport motorcycle.

WHAT IS NOT SO GOOD?

This out of the box readiness comes with its own downside, that being its sizeable bulk, at 176kg dry, to push along. It is very difficult to bring this weight down in any meaningful way to make the KLR more “sporty”. On the old model replacing the Balancer Chain Adjuster Lever also know as the “doohickey” is a common mod made by users to ensure the engine remains bulletproof.  The newer model also has a slight flaw in that it is well known for having a tendency to burn oil if kept at high revs, so it’s worth keeping an eye on this on long travels. 

 

Kawasaki - KLR650

Kawasaki KLR650 Dual-Sport Motorcycle

Kawasaki KLR650 - Specs

Production dates: 1987- Present                   Price: $6,699 

Power: 42 hp                                                      Engine Size: 651 cc

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; LIQUID Cooled / Air cooled (pre-2008)

Dry Weight: 176kg (388lbs)                             Wet Weight: 196kg (432lbs)

Fuelling: Carburator

Tank Size: 23 Litre (6.1 US Gal)

Production dates: 1987- Present                   

Price: $6,699 

Power: 42 hp                     Engine Size: 651 cc

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; LIQUID Cooled / Air cooled (pre-2008)

Dry Weight: 176kg (388lbs)                             

Wet Weight: 196kg (432lbs)

Fuelling: Carburetor

Tank Size: 23 Litre (6.1 US Gal)

KTM - 640 Adventure

KTM 640 Adventure Dual-Sport Motorcycle

KTM 640 Adventure - Specs

Production dates: 1999 – 2007                        Price (2nd hand): $4,500 – £3,000 

Power: 53 hp                                                       Engine Size: 625 cc

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Liquid Cooled

Dry Weight: 154kg (340lbs)                             Wet Weight: 181kg (400lbs)

Fuelling: Carburator

Tank Size: 28 Litre (7.4 US Gal)

Production dates: 1999 – 2007                       

Price (2nd hand): $4,500 – £3,000 

Power: 53 hp                       Engine Size: 625 cc

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Liquid Cooled

Dry Weight: 154kg (340lbs)                            

Wet Weight: 181kg (400lbs)

Fuelling: Carburetor

Tank Size: 28 Litre (7.4 US Gal)

KTM - 640 Adventure

Lightweight
60%
Power
60%
Offroad Ability
80%
Road Manners
50%

About

The KTM 640 Adventure is produced by KTM AG a company renowned for its high-performance race orientated machines. The 640 Adventure is a different breed however, what makes it stand out is that KTM have given some serious thought to adventure riders when it came to outfitting this dual-sport motorcycle. 

WHY IS IT GOOD?

The bike comes standard with a massive 28-litre tank, a generous fairing for wind protection, and a backup kick-starter in case your battery runs flat. As usual, KTM delivers all its bikes with quality components with performance at the centre stage. The front end is carefully suspended by WP adjustable forks which hold in place two Brembo callipers for heaps of stopping power. The excellent suspension combined with its 154kg dry weight makes the 640 Adventure a powerhouse compared to many of the other bikes in its category

The single-cylinder, liquid-cooled 625cc LC4 engine delivers plenty of power and is featured on many of KTM’s other bikes, making spares widely readily despite its now ageing design.  Production ended in 2007 which makes used models an attractive option price-wise with very little change necessary to take the bike on any offroad adventure.

WHAT’S NOT SO GOOD?

Performance does come at a price, as the highly-strung single-cylinder engine is vibey on long journeys on the motorway and does require more maintenance than its Japanese counterparts. The 640 Adventure does incorporate both a fuel pump and a water pump to keep running, parts that do occasionally fail. The long-travel suspension also puts the seat height on the high side at 945 mm (37.2 in)!

Yamaha - XT660Z Tenere

Lightweight
45%
Power
50%
Offroad Ability
60%
Road Manners
65%

About

Built by Yamaha Motor Company and named after the famous Tenere desert in the Sahara the Yamaha XTZ was part of Yamaha’s resurgence in 2008 back into the middleweight adventure riding market, having been absent for many years.

WHY IS IT GOOD?

As apparent by many of the design choices, Yamaha did their research when producing the XT660Z, this dual-sport motorcycle comes stock with a 23-litre large capacity fuel tank, a generous windscreen and fairing as standard, and cleverly designed side panels that are replaceable in case of a fall, a very thoughtful and unique feature.

The plush suspension, managed by its 43mm front forks is slightly on the soft side but can readily handle rough terrain. The liquid-cooled, fuel-injected engine produces 46 horsepower, but generates very good fuel economy and there are no jets changes to think about when climbing and descending in altitude as you would with a carburetted bike. 

The XTZ 660 Tenere is quite possibly one of the best dual-sport motorcycles ever designed, its bombproof construction has the range, features and protections to take riders on some serious offroad adventures.

WHAT’S NOT SO GOOD?

Sadly, with 183kg of dry weight to propel, being almost 30kg heavier than a DR650, and with only 46 horsepower the XT660Z is no powerhouse and borders on the morbidly obese. This mostly come to show when riding offroad in technical terrain, where the Tenere is not as agile as it could. The fuel injection is also reputed for being a bit snatchy. It however remains a solid package with many riders having taken the XT660Z on round the world journeys with little complaint.

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The XT660Z engine is borrowed from its cousin the XT660R, another bike in the Yamaha line up which despite its look is probably best used on tarmac than off and doesn’t come equipped with as many features as the XT660Z Tenere. – Anton

Yamaha - XT660Z Tenere

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“I chose the Tenere because I know Yamaha, secondly it is tall like me, and is easy to fix and parts are available worldwide. It is also great off-road!” – Spencer Conway, The Motorcycle Diaries

Photo and quote used with permission from Spencer Conway.

Yamaha XT660Z Tenere - Specs

Production dates: 2008 – 2016                    Price: £5,500 (not sold USA)

Power: 46 hp                                                    Engine Size: 660 cc

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Liquid Cooled

Dry Weight: 183kg (403.4lbs)                        Wet Weight: 206kg (454lbs)

Fuelling: Fuel Injection

Tank Size: 23 Litre (6.1 US Gal)

Production dates: 2008 – 2016                    

Price: £5,500 (not sold USA)

Power: 46 hp                     Engine Size: 660 cc

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Liquid Cooled

Dry Weight: 183kg (403.4lbs)                        

Wet Weight: 206kg (454lbs)

Fuelling: Fuel Injection

Tank Size: 23 Litre (6.1 US Gal)

BMW - F650 GS Dakar

BMW F650 GS Dual-Sport Motorcycle

BMW F650 GS Dakar - Specs

Production dates: 2000 – 2008                         Price (2nd hand): $5,000 – £3,500

Power: 50 hp                                                         Engine Size: 652 cc

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Liquid Cooled

Dry Weight: 176kg (388lbs)                                Wet Weight: 193kg (425lbs)

Fueling: Fuel Injection

Tank Size: 17.3 Litre (4.6 US Gal)

Production dates: 2000 – 2008                   

Price (2nd hand): $5,000 – £3,500

Power: 50 hp                   Engine Size: 652 cc

Engine Type: Single Cylinder; Four Stroke; Liquid Cooled

Dry Weight: 176kg (388lbs)                          

Wet Weight: 193kg (425lbs)

Fueling: Fuel Injection

Tank Size: 17.3 Litre (4.6 US Gal)

BMW - F650 GS Dakar

Lightweight
50%
Power
50%
Offroad Ability
60%
Road Manners
70%

About

The F650GS Dakar, (now superseded by the BMW Sertão) was produced until 2008 by BMW Motorrad, one of the leaders in the adventure motorcycling segment thanks to their GS range of bikes. BMW have produced some of the most iconic and reliable motorcycles in the market to date, thanks to their long and storied history.

WHY IS IT GOOD?

There is much to like about the F650 GS Dakar as a dual-sport motorcycle, it has a very economical fuel-injected single-cylinder engine, which produces a good amount of power. The forks are conventional 41 mm units which are on the soft side but still very usable offroad. It boasts a windscreen for those long road stretches and has a decent 17-litre large fuel tank to boot. 

The F650GS Dakar is reputed as a reliable long-distance machine, it has been widely used as a solid round the world-tourer, being a smaller, more nimble (and offroad worthy) alternative to the 1200GS behemoth, that is BMW’s flagship. Production ended in 2008, which makes the F650 GS good value second-hand, with aftermarket parts easily available to equip the bike for any adventure. 

WHAT’S NOT SO GOOD? 

The F650GS is on the heavy side, but not dramatically so, it might also be slightly underpowered. However, its biggest flaw might actually be its predictable linear engine delivery, which might not be a big issue if that is a compromise you are willing to make for such a balanced package. Spares will end costing more than your typical japanese dual-sport and you’ll need more specialized tools, but with BMW build quality there is not much that can go wrong. 

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To note, there are two BMW models named F650 GS one is the single-cylinder version and the other is a twin-cylinder machine which is a good commuter bike but is best not used offroad too much. The “Dakar” version of the single-cylinder F650 GS has higher travel suspension than its counterpart, being 40 mm higher at the front and raised by 45mm at the back, making it the one best suited for rougher offroad adventures.  – Anton

If you’re looking for a good read, the BMW F650GS Dakar features in Metaljockey’s (and friends) gripping expedition to the remote West Coast of Angola on Advrider.com.

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